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Eric Clapton

Started by chellinoolmo, January 13, 2015, 06:51:20 PM

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chellinoolmo




Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE (born 30 March 1945) is an English blues-rock guitarist, singer, songwriter and composer. Clapton is the only person who has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame three times; as a solo performer, as well as a member of rock bands the Yardbirds and Cream. Throughout his career, Clapton has been viewed by critics and fans alike as one of the most important and influential guitarists of all time, Clapton was ranked fourth in Rolling Stone magazine's list of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time" and #53 on their list of the "Immortals: 100 Greatest Artists of All Time". In 2010, Clapton was ranked #4 on Gibson's Top 50 Guitarists of All Time.
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chellinoolmo

>http://www.youtube.com/v/fGDIxcuPT7s&rel=0


"Change the World" is a song written by Tommy Sims, Gordon Kennedy (musician) and Wayne Kirkpatrick which was recorded by Eric Clapton with backing by Babyface for the soundtrack of the 1996 film Phenomenon. The song won Grammy Awards for Record of the Year, Song of the Year (for the songwriters), as well as Best Male Pop Vocal performance. The song was chosen by the RIAA as one of the Songs of the Century, ranked at #270.

The single peaked at #5 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the summer of 1996. It also spent 13 weeks at #1 on the adult contemporary chart and remained on that chart for over a year and a half (80 weeks), a feat which was extraordinarily rare at the time. Since then, however, certain songs have remained on the AC chart for extended periods of time, prompting the eventual creation af an Adult Contemporary recurrent chart for songs that have stayed on the chart for many weeks and fallen below a certain threshold.

Although "Change the World" is better known as an unplugged acoustic track, a rare electric performance of the song was featured on Babyface's 1997 live album Babyface MTV Unplugged NYC, with Clapton on co-lead vocals, playing his namesake signature Fender Stratocaster guitar. There was also another electric cover of this track, released the following year, with Nathan East on electric bass.

In the song, the performer expresses his desire to communicate his love to an unnamed woman. This love, he fears, will go unrequited without a drastic change in his life.

Previous to the release of Clapton's hit version, the song was recorded by country superstar Wynonna Judd for her album Revelations, released in February 1996. Wynonna, however, did not release her version as a single despite the popularity of Clapton's.










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chellinoolmo

>http://www.youtube.com/v/qYS732zyYfU&rel=0


"Cocaine" is a song written and recorded by JJ Cale in 1976 and most widely known in a cover version recorded by Eric Clapton. Allmusic  calls the latter "among [Clapton's] most enduringly popular hits" and notes that "even for an artist like Clapton with a huge body of high-quality work, 'Cocaine' ranks among his best."

Glyn Johns, who had previously worked with The Who, Led Zeppelin and The Rolling Stones, produced the Clapton recording, which was released on Clapton's 1977 album Slowhand and as a single in 1980. "Cocaine" failed to chart on the Billboard Hot 100 except as the 'B' side of "Lay Down Sally", which was a No. 3 hit in early 1978. "Cocaine" was one of several of Cale's songs recorded by Clapton, including "After Midnight" and "Travelin' Light".


Eric Clapton describes "Cocaine" as "an anti-drug-song. The fans only listen to the refrain: ââ,¬ËœShe donââ,¬â,,¢t lie, she donââ,¬â,,¢t lie, she don't lie, cocaine.ââ,¬â,,¢ But it says, ââ,¬ËœIf you wanna get down, down on the ground, cocaine.ââ,¬â,,¢" The song also contains the lyric: "Don't forget this fact, you can't get it back". Clapton has called the song "quite cleverly anti-cocaine", noting:

    "Itââ,¬â,,¢s no good to write a deliberate anti-drug song and hope that it will catch. Because the general thing is that people will be upset by that. It would disturb them to have someone else shoving something down their throat. So the best thing to do is offer something that seems ambiguousââ,¬â€that on study or on reflection actually can be seen to be ââ,¬Ëœantiââ,¬â,,¢Ã¢â,¬â€which the song "Cocaine" is actually an anti-cocaine song. If you study it or look at it with a little bit of thought... from a distance... or as it goes by... it just sounds like a song about cocaine. But actually, it is quite cleverly anti-cocaine."

Over the years, Clapton has added the lyrics 'that dirty cocaine' in live shows to underline the anti-drug message of the song.










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chellinoolmo

>http://www.youtube.com/v/7IypO0bnuzI&rel=0


"Lay Down Sally" is a single by Eric Clapton. It appeared on his November 1977 album Slowhand, and reached No. 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. It is a shuffle performed in the style of J. J. Cale  and Clapton also attributed other members of his band like Carl Radle of Oklahoma, George Terry, Oldaker and other members of the band as influencing the song.
Clapton explained, "It's as close as I can get, being English, but the band being a Tulsa band, they play like that naturally. You couldn't get them to do an English rock sound, no way. Their idea of a driving beat isn't being loud or anything. It's subtle." [1]

The single was a crossover country music hit, reaching No. 26 in April 1978, Clapton's best showing on that chart.










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chellinoolmo

>http://www.youtube.com/v/PTAMkbaXKXw&rel=0


"Tears in Heaven" is a ballad written by Eric Clapton and Will Jennings  about the pain Clapton felt following the death of his four-year-old son, Conor, who fell from a window of the 53rd-floor New York apartment of his mother's friend, on March 20, 1991. Clapton, who arrived at the apartment shortly after the accident, was visibly distraught for months afterwards. This song is one of Clapton's most successful, reaching #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in the U.S. The song also spent three weeks at #1 on the American adult contemporary chart in 1992.

Will Jennings, who worked with Clapton on the song, was reluctant at first to help him with such a personal song.[2] The song was initially featured on the soundtrack to the film Rush, and it won three Grammy awards for Song of the Year, Record of the Year and Male Pop Vocal Performance in 1993.

    "Eric and I were engaged to write a song for a movie called Rush. We wrote a song called 'Help Me Up' for the end of the movie... then Eric saw another place in the movie for a song and he said to me, 'I want to write a song about my boy.' Eric had the first verse of the song written, which, to me, is all the song, but he wanted me to write the rest of the verse lines and the release ('Time can bring you down, time can bend your knees...'), even though I told him that it was so personal he should write everything himself. He told me that he had admired the work I did with Steve Winwood and finally there was nothing else but to do as he requested, despite the sensitivity of the subject. This is a song so personal and so sad that it is unique in my experience of writing songs." ââ,¬â€œ Will Jennings[3]

Clapton stopped playing it in 2004, as well as the song "My Father's Eyes".

    "I didn't feel the loss anymore, which is so much a part of performing those songs. I really have to connect with the feelings that were there when I wrote them. They're kind of gone and I really don't want them to come back, particularly. My life is different now. They probably just need a rest and maybe I'll introduce them for a much more detached point of view."










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chellinoolmo

"Wonderful Tonight" is a song written by Eric Clapton. It was included on Clapton's 1977 album Slowhand and released as a single the following year. Clapton wrote the song about Pattie Boyd, and it is mentioned in her autobiographical book Wonderful Tonight: George Harrison, Eric Clapton, and Me.

On 7 September 1976, Clapton wrote "Wonderful Tonight" for Boyd while waiting for her to get ready to attend Paul and Linda McCartney's annual Buddy Holly party. Of "Wonderful Tonight," Boyd would say: "For years it tore at me. To have inspired Eric, and George before him, to write such music was so flattering. 'Wonderful Tonight' was the most poignant reminder of all that was good in our relationship, and when things went wrong it was torture to hear it."

In 1988, Clapton appeared in the Nelson Mandela 70th Birthday Tribute concert as a guest guitarist for Dire Straits. The group became his backing musicians for a surprise performance of "Wonderful Tonight" during their set.










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chellinoolmo

>http://www.youtube.com/v/10qLYy6hiFQ&rel=0

"I Shot the Sheriff" is a song written by Bob Marley, told from the point of view of a man who admits to having killed the local sheriff, but claims to be falsely accused of having killed the deputy sheriff. The song was first released on The Wailers' album Burnin'.

Eric Clapton recorded a cover version that was included on his album, 461 Ocean Boulevard. It is the most successful version of the song, peaking at #1 on the Billboard Hot 100, becoming Clapton's only chart-topping hit in the U.S.










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chellinoolmo



>http://www.youtube.com/v/omwpY42J1Fk&rel=0

Just One Night is a live double album by blues rocker Eric Clapton, released in 1980. It was recorded live at the Budokan Theatre, Tokyo, December 1979 when Clapton was touring with his last record, Backless. The sleeve contains a Japanese painting by Ken Konno.










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chellinoolmo

>http://www.youtube.com/v/fX5USg8_1gA&rel=0










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ludo willems

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